Special Issue: Religion, Healing, and Public Health

New Perspectives on Health and Healing

Can Science and Religion Work Together?


What Do You Believe In?
Special, Guest-Edited Issue on Religion, Healing, ad Public Health


"You can't hide from religion in Georgia. If you don't go after it with a positive agenda, it will come after you."
Gary Gunderson, Director, Interfaith Health Program

"To understand our patients fully, we need to understand their beliefs, or we will not be effective as their healers."
Lori Arviso Alvord, Assistant Professor of Surgery and Associate Dean for Student Affairs, Dartmouth Medical School

New Perspectives on Health and Healing
Can Science and Religion Work Together?

An integrated exploration
A three-pronged approach to health, healing, and spirituality

A cross-cultural perspective
P. Venugopala Rao, Associate Professor of Physics

Mrs. Bradley's body
Carla Gober, Registered Nurse and Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Division of Religion

Spirituality and Modern Medicine
Science on a wing and prayer?

Between Patient and Healer
Four anthropological observations

Return to Contents

 

Winship Ballroom, Dobbs University Center
Friday, April 11, 7:30


Keynote Address: “Ceremony Medicine: a Navajo Philosophy of Healing”
By Lori Alvord
Saturday, April 12,
9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Panel discussions, followed by lunch
with the panelists, table discussions,
and a wrap-up session.

Speakers

Lori Alvord, surgeon and author of
The Scalpel and the Silver Bear: The First Navajo Woman Surgeon Combines Western Medicine and Traditional Healing

Richard Selzer, surgeon and author of The Doctor Stories and The Exact Location of the Soul

Sherwin Nuland, surgeon, medical historian, and author of How We Die: Reflections on Life’s Final Chapter and the memoir Lost in America: A Journey with My Father

Thomas Thangaraj, D.W. and Ruth
Brooks Associate Professor of World Christianity, Candler School of Theology

Claire Sterk, Professor and Chair, Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health will serve as synthesizer.