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ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Forefront

Blackboard Phaseout to Conclude August 2017

Emory will decommission its use of the Blackboard course platform on August 31, 2017. For instructions on exporting and archiving material and data saved on the Blackboard platform, please visit this link. Current Blackboard sites will be availabe until August 31, but Teaching and Learning Technologies (TLT) encourages users to move material well in advance; in most cases, utilizing Emory Box is the best option. Anyone with an Emory University or Healthcare network ID may log into Box and share documents, as well as use it for collaborating. Office hours are available for organization owners to schedule time to meet with the TLT Canvas team to help organizations move content to the new Canvas system. To schedule an appointment, visit this link.

More information on the migration to Canvas is available here.

From Excellence to Eminence

Art History Professor Wins National Teaching Award

Bonna Wescoat, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art History, has been awarded the 2017 Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award by the Archaeological Institute of America. The award recognizes innovative and interdisciplinary pedagogues who are actively teaching. In the past, Wescoat has sent her students on campus-wide scavenger hunts, directed excavations, and created 3D renderings to teach students about Greek and Roman architecture and antiquities. For more information, please visit this link.

Heard on Campus

Afrofuturism and Temporality

Afrofuturism comprises cultural production and political and aesthetic thought -- including music, literature, visual art, comics, photography, film, performance art, and theory -- that may either represent a dystopic future where present-day social ills are intensified, or a better, alternate reality. . . . In the process, Afrofuturism imagines and represents alternate forms of the black human subject -- superheroes, cyborgs, hybrid beings -- and it centers those black subjects. I want to begin with a bold assertion today, and that’s that contemporary Afrofuturism is the most important African-American cultural movement since the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement. I want to assert that it’s more significant, and potentially more influential, [than either of those movements]. I think it’s so in part because Afrofuturism’s frequently digital nature allows for ready dialogue between scholars and creators. . . . That’s not to say there wasn’t collaboration in prior movements, but I think the degree of it, and the facility of it, in Afrofuturism, distinguishes it. . . . I think the other element that empowers Afrofuturism is its strongly inclusive and centrally feminist elements, which I think you can’t really say of the Black Arts Movement. . . . And also, Afrofuturism isn’t just in the United States. There’s African Afrofuturism, and there is black diasporic Afrofuturism. But perhaps most central to my purpose today, I think that Afrofuturism’s sustained connections among past, present, and future distinguish it from the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement.

-- Daylanne English, professor and chair of English at Macalester College, during her talk "'Swing Low, Time to Move On': Afrofuturism and the Afterlife," Tuesday, January 24, 2017, part of the department of African American Studies's Futures in African American Literature and Culture series

Resources for Faculty

Podcasts from Fall 2016 CMBC Talks Now Available

The Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture offers a series of podcasts recorded from talks it sponsored in fall 2016. They are available via the center's website and iTunes. The full listing of podcasts dates back to 2012, and the new entries from fall 2016 include

  • Ilinia Singh (University of Oxford): Disciplinary Disharmonies: Can There Be a Shared Vision for Global Neuroscience Ethics?
  • Anne Cleary (Colorado State University): How Metacognitive States Like Tip-of-the-Tongue and Deja-Vu Can Be Biasing
  • David C. Wilson (University of Delaware): The Continuing Significance of Race in American Politics: Racial Resentment and the Pain of Progress
  • Sarah Brosnan (Georgia State University): Comparative Decision Making in Non-Human Primates
New to the Faculty

Thomas Osburn, Assistant Professor of Physics

Thomas Osburn completed his PhD in physics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2016). Osburn's primary scholarly focus is gravitational wave astrophysics and black hole perturbation theory. His articles have been published in a number of leading journals including Physical Review and Journal of the Electrochemical Society.

Events This Week

Monday, February 20

Tibet Week at Oxford College begins. For more information, please visit this link.

The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference's Race and Difference Colloquium Series will continue at noon with Kenneth Janken (African American Studies, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) speaking on "The Wilmington Ten." Colloquiums take place in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library; please click here to RSVP.

Sonya Quintanilla, George P. Bickford Curator of Indian and Southeast Asian Art at the Cleveland Museum of Art, will give a lecture titled "Stories Within Stories: Paintings from Mughal India" at 7:30 p.m. in the Ackerman Hall of the Michael C. Carlos Museum.

Camille Cottrell (associate professor of art history, Oxford College) will give a lecture at 7:30 p.m. in the chapel of Oxford College. For more information, please visit this link.

Tuesday, February 21

The Domain of One's Own program will host Katherine Ostrom (lecturer in Spanish and Portuguese) for a talk titled "Digital Publishing and Language Learning" at noon in Cox Computing, Classroom C. Please RSVP to heather.julien@emory.edu.

The Department of African American Studies Spring Lecture Series on "Futures in African American Literature and Culture" presents Dagmawi Woubshet (Africana Studies, Cornell), who will speak on "Another Time, Another Space: James Baldwin's Late Style." This event will take place at 4:00 pm in 207 Candler Library. For more information, please visit this link.

Azim Shariff (psychology, University of California-Irvine) will speak on "The Evolution, Purpose, and Consequences of Religious Prosociality" at 4:00 p.m. in PAIS 290. This event is sponsored by the Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture.

Wednesday, February 22

Sarah Donaldson (Catherine and Howard Avery Professor, Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine) will speak on "The Joy in Medicine" at 7:30 a.m. in the Winship Kauffman Auditorium, C5012. This event is part of the Winship Grand Rounds series.

The Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives presents An Introduction to Protocol Workshop from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Governor's Hall, Miller-Ward Alumni House. Protocol and Diplomacy International - Protocol Officers Association will conduct a full-day regional workshop for protocol professionals, those interested in the profession, and those in the general public interested in enhancing their skills in protocol and cross-cultural literacy. For more information or to register, please visit this link.

Evelyn L. Parker (Susanna Wesley Centennial Professor of Practical Theology and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Southern Methodist University's Perkins School of Theology) will deliver the Anna Julia Cooper lecture, titled "The Church and Its Care for Black Bodies," at 11:00 a.m. in room 252 of the Candler School of Theology. Please click here for more information or to register (required).

As part of the Religion and Ecology Collaborative, Don Saliers (William R. Cannon Distinguished Professor of Theology and Worship, Emeritus) will speak on Pope Francis's 2015 encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si', at noon in room 102 of the Rita Anne Rollins Building. For more information, please email elwhiti@emory.edu.

The next Neuroethics and Neuroscience in the News event will be held at 2:30 p.m. in Center for Ethics room 162 on the topic "Memory Enhancement Through Brain Recording and Stimulation: Implication of Brain Prosthetics for Memory, Identity, and Autonomy," facilitated by Cory Inman (medicine). For more information, including how to register (required), please visit ethics.emory.edu.

Matthew Taliaferro (biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) will speak on "Delivering the Message: RNA Localization in Neurons" at 4:00 p.m. in 400 Whitehead Building. This talk is part of the cell biology seminar series.

The German Studies Department will host Eve-Marie Becker (Distinguished Visiting Professor of New Testament in the Candler School of Theology) for a talk titled "Luther's Paul: Rediscovering the Category of Theological Thinking," at 4:00 p.m. in room 201 of the Modern Languages Building.

The Emory Cinematheque series, which coincides with the UCLA Film & Television Archive Festival of Preservation Tour this semester, will continue at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208 with screenings of White Zombie and the Crime of Dr. Crespi.

Thursday, February 23

As part of the surgery department's Grand Rounds series, Albert Diehl III (Chief Resident, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine) will speak on "A Surgeon's Uniform" at 7:00 a.m. in the Emory University Hospital Auditorium.

The 14th Annual Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal Symposium will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Tull Auditorium, Emory University School of Law. For more information or to register, please visit this link.

Lucila Ohno-Machado (biomedical informatics, University of California-San Diego) will give a lecture titled "DataMed: A Data Discovery Index for the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Commons" as part of the Scientific Publishing Seminar series at 11:00 a.m. in the Rita Rollins Room, Rollins School of Public Health.

David Pagliarini (biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison) will speak on "Wiring the Powerhouse: Systems-to-Structure Approaches for Characterizing the Mitochondrial Proteome" at noon in the Whitehead Auditorium. This event is part of the biochemistry seminar series.

The Writing Program presents a workshop titled "Making your composition pedagogy more inclusive," with George Williams (English, University of South Carolina Upstate), a co-founder of ProfHacker and the Building an Accessible Future for the Humanities Project. This event will take place from 1:30 to 3:00 pm in the KempMalone Library, Callaway 310. Williams also will present a workshop on Friday (see below). For more information and to RSVP, please visit this link.

The Center for Ethics presents "Brokered Dialogue: Modeling Respectful Engagement in Turbulent Times," with James V. Lavery, Conrad N. Hilton Chair in Global Health Ethics and Professor of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, as part of the Monthly Clinical Ethics Seminars series. This event will take place at 4:00 pm in the Center for Ethics Seminar Room (162). For more information please visit this link.

In conjunction with the exhibition "Still Raising Hell: The Art, Activism, and Archives of Camille Billops and James V. Hatch," "'Let's Go to Work!': The Spread of Chicago Steppin in Atlanta," a performance and discussion moderated by cultural sociologist and stepper Anjulet Tucker, will be held at 6:00 p.m. in the Schatten Gallery of the Woodruff Library. For more information, please visit this link.

The Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry will continue its four-part seminar, "One Hundred Years of Shakespeare in Atlanta," at 6:30 p.m. in the Fox Center. Patricia Cahill (English) will moderate. For further information or to reserve seating, please email the Fox Center at foxcenter@emory.edu or call 404.727.6424.

The Emory Chinese Theater Club will present a performance of the play Mr. Donkey at 7:30 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre, Burlington Road Building. Performances will also be held on Friday, February 24 and Saturday, February 25, all at 7:30 p.m. For more information or for tickets, please visit this link.

Carolyn Woo, former dean of the top-ranked Mendoza Business School at the University of Notre Dame and then the president of Catholic Relief Services, USA, will speak at 7:30 p.m. on "Women Leadership in the Catholic Church." This talk will take place in the Claudia Nance Rollins Building's P-Level Auditorium. For more information or to register, please visit aquinas.emory.edu.

Friday, February 24

The "I Am NOT An Animal!" Symposium will be held through Saturday, February 25, at the Emory Conference Center Hotel. For more information, please visit this link.

The Emory International Law Review and the Center for International and Comparative Law will host "Life After Brexit: The Future of the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe" from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Goizueta Business School, room W100. To register, please visit this link.

Pianist Philip Thomson will perform a free concert at noon in the Ackerman Hall, Michael C. Carlos Museum. For more information, please see Music at Emory.

George H. Williams (English, University of South Carolina Upstate) will speak on "Strategies for Creating an Accessible Writing Course" from noon to 1:15 p.m. in White Hall 200. This event is sponsored by Writing Across Emory.

The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference presents a public symposium, "Black Politics After Obama," from 1:00 to 8:30 p.m. at the Center for Civil and Human Rights. For more information or to register, please visit this link.

Emory Center for Digital Scholarship and the Emory Institute for Quantitative Theories and Methods will partner to hold a workshop, "GIS Workshop: Application of Geographic Information Systems," from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. in Woodruff Library room 314. For more information, including how to RSVP, please click here.

Global and Postcolonial Studies will host "The Art of Anger" at 2:00 p.m. in Callaway N301 (Kemp Malone Library). This event features a special focus on literature from the Muslim-majority countries subject to the recent immigration ban.

The Graduate Philosophy Society at Emory will host a panel discussion titled "Art and Politics: A Conversation" at 3:30 p.m. in White Hall 112. For more information, please visit this link.

Jacques de Courtils (Universite de Bordeaux Montaigne) will speak on "Avenues of Innovation and Communication in Third Century BC Greek Architecture" at 7:00 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Ackerman Hall. Please see arthistory.emory.edu to learn more.

Performances of the play Big Love will be held in the Tarbutton Performing Arts Center (Oxford College) at 7:30 p.m. and again on Saturday, February 25 at 3:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. For more information, please visit this link.

The Emory Wind Ensemble will perform at 8:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see Music at Emory.

Saturday, February 25

A colloquium on "Architectual Interactions in the Northern Aegean" will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Ackerman Hall. Please see arthistory.emory.edu to learn more.

Sunday, February 26

As part of the Candler Concert Series, Katia and Marielle Labèque will perform a piano duet at 4:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see Music at Emory.

Monday, February 27

The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference's Race and Difference Colloquium Series will continue at noon with Kimberly Hoang (sociology, University of Chicago) speaking on "Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work." Colloquiums take place in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library; please click here to RSVP.

The Carlos Reads Book Club of spring 2017 continues at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Board Room, Level Two. Pamela Scully (African Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) will continue the series by leading discussion on Nervous Conditions. For more information on the book club, to reserve a space, or to see the full semester's offerings, please click here.

The Gloriosa Trio will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall (Oxford College). For more information, please visit this link.

For more events at Emory, visit http://www.emory.edu/home/events.

ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Monday, February 20, 2016, Volume 17, Issue 24

ThoughtWork is a publication of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, which is supported by the Office of the Provost. This electronic newsletter list is moderated; replies are not automatically forwarded to the list of recipients. Please email aadam02@emory.edu with comments and calendar submissions. Calendar submissions are due 5:00pm the Wednesday before the week of the event. Dates and details of events on calendar are subject to change; please confirm with organizers before you attend.

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Allison Adams
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