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ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Forefront

Innovative Pedagogies: Teaching Across the University

Emory offers many interdisciplinary courses that cross traditional pedagogical boundaries, cross disciplines and schools, and integrate the liberal arts mission across the university. Faculty participating in these courses learn to teach in new and different ways, acquire specific tools and strategies, discover new conceptualizations, and perhaps find new resources that will infuse their future teaching and scholarship.The Center for Faculty Development (CFDE) and the Coalition for the Liberal Arts (CoLA) have developed a series of workshops, talks, and discussions on the topic of teaching broad, interdisciplinary courses that cross traditional intellectual boundaries and integrate the liberal arts mission across the university. The Innovative Pedagogies conversations will highlight and reflect on the challenges and rewards of teaching across the university. Three events in this series have been scheduled so far, with more information to come on each:

  • "How Interdisciplinary Teaching Transforms Teaching and Scholarship" faculty panel discussion on Thursday, March 3 from 4:15 to 6:00 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library.
  • "The Work of Art in the World Creates Pre-Texts for Teaching and Learning," with Doris Sommer of Harvard University on Friday, April 1 from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. This talk is co-sponsored with the department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Hightower Fund, the Center for Ethics, the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, the American Studies Program, the IDEAS Fellows Program, and the Emory College Language Center.
  • "Coalition of the Liberal Arts Courses"faculty panel discussion on Thursday, April 14, from 5:15 to 7:00 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library.

Please see the CFDE website for more information.

From Excellence to Eminence

Carlos Museum Curator Wins PROSE Award

Melinda Hartwig, curator of Egyptian, Nubian, and Ancient Near Eastern Art, has won the PROSE award in the category of Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Science for her reference title A Companion to Ancient Egyptian Art. The PROSE Awards, presented by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers, annually recognize the very best in professional and scholarly publishing. For more on this award or Hartwig's text, please visit this link.

Heard on Campus

The Role of Antibiotics in Twentieth Century Medicine

[In 1900], the first three major causes of mortality were infection. And heart disease was number four, and cancer was number eight. . . . Diphtheria was up there. . . . So what happened? Why would cancer all of a sudden jump up? Cancer is now number two, heart disease is number one. It’s sort of obvious, when you think about it. The expected life span . . .  a child had a very high rate of mortality, not expected to live past age five or so, and if you don’t die of diphtheria at age five, you’re markedly reducing the chances of cancer at age eighty-five. So, we’ve made a shift away from infection. . . . Now, when we look at the sources of mortality, we see infection is way down, very, very low, comparatively. . . . We clearly have made a profound change, and largely through control of infection. Now, antibiotics are clearly effective, there’s no question about this… but antibiotics cannot wholly account for this decline. . . . So, in a way, antibiotics, as effective as they might be, really came quite late in the game.

--Bruce Levin, Samuel C. Dobbs Professor of Biology, from the Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Bacteria, Viruses, Antibiotics, and Too Much Fun,” Tuesday, February 2, presented as part of Founders Week

Resources for Faculty

Deadline Extended for Piedmont Project Faculty Workshop

A few spots remain open for this year's Piedmont Project faculty workshop. The workshop will be held May 11 and 12, 2016. The Piedmont Project brings together faculty from across the university to support new courses and course modules that strengthen curricular engagement with issues of sustainability, environmental awareness, and urgent societal challenge. Summer stipends are available to develop new courses or course materials.

To apply, please send an email to Sarah Whitaker (swhita@emory.edu) with the following information: name, departmental affiliation and title, email and telephone, and a one or two-paragraph description of how you plan to change an existing course or develop a new one that will incorporate sustainability issues. If applicable, please describe briefly how your project might be connected to climate change, involve engaged learning in Atlanta or on campus, or explore diverse disciplinary approaches. Applications will be accepted until remaining places are filled.

New to the Faculty

Juan Rubio-Ramirez, Acting Professor of Economics

Juan Rubio-Ramirez received his PhD in economics from University of Minnesota (2001). Prior to joining Emory University in 2015, he was a full professor at Duke University. He also held a full-time appointment at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Currently, he is visiting scholar to the European Central Bank and several Federal Reserve Banks. He also collaborates with Fulcrum Asset Management Hedge in London, United Kingdom.  He is a macroeconomist who focuses on dynamic equilibrium macroeconomic models and Bayesian econometrics. His articles have been published in journals including Econometrica, American Economic Review, and Journal of Econometrics.

To view a list of all new Emory faculty in 2015-16, please visit provost.emory.edu.

Events This Week

Monday, February 15

Allyson Hobbs, assistant professor of history at Stanford University, will present "A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life" as part of the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference's Race and Difference Colloquium. This event will take place in the Jones Room at the Woodruff Library from noon to 1:30 p.m. Please RSVP to jwji@emory.edu.

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion will sponsor the Berman Lecture, titled "Reason and Revelation: A Conversation on Natural Law in Four Religions" at noon in room 575, Gambrell Hall. Lunch will be served; to RSVP, please click here.

There will be a Zotero Workshop at 4:00 p.m. in room 312 of the Woodruff Library. For more information, please click here.

Digital Mapping and the Humanities, a spring 2016 public lecture series, will continue with Niall Atkinson of the University of Chicago speaking on "Seeing Sound: Mapping Florentine Soundscapes." This lecture will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library.

The fourth Carlos Reads Book Club event of the spring 2016 semester will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Board Room, Level Two. Christine Perkell, professor of classics and Virgil scholar, will lead discussion on Virgil's The Aeneid. For more information on the book club, to reserve a space, or to see the full semester's offerings, please click here.

Katherine Siochi will give a harp performance at 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall (Oxford College). Please click here to learn more.

Tuesday, February 16

Nicki Pesik, senior advisor, global health security and international public health at the Centers for Disease Control, will give the 7th Annual Arthur L. Kellermann Health Policy Lecture and Grand Rounds at 11:00 a.m. in Auditorium 120, James B. Williams School of Medicine Building. For more information, please see the website for the Emergency Medicine Grand Rounds.

The Pitts Weekly Workshop series will offer Digital Tools for Exegesis at noon in the Pitts Theology Library. Sarah Bogue, reference and instruction librarian, will present. Please click here to learn more or to register.

Kahente Horn-Miller, New Sun Visiting Aboriginal Scholar (Canadian Studies, Carleton University), will give a talk titled "We are in her and she is in us? Revisiting the Skywoman Story." This talk will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the Carlos Museum, third floor. Please see the Carlos Museum for more details.

The Institute for Developing Nations will host Markku Suksi (law, Abo Akademi University, Finland) for a talk titled "The Use of Reports from Election Observation Missions Before Treaty Bodies: Can Mission Reports Constitute Evidence?" This talk will take place at 4:30 p.m. in PAIS 230.

Wednesday, February 17

The Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS) will host a workshop titled "Digital Writing Assignments" from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in the ECDS Conference Room. For more information or to register, please click here.

Wendy Farley (religion) will host ProfChat from 11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Cannon Chapel, Brooks Commons. For more information, please click here.

The Pitts Weekly Workshop series will offer Resources for Worship at noon in the Pitts Theology Library. Sarah Bogue, reference and instruction librarian, will present. Please click here to learn more or to register.

At noon, there will be a Neuroethics in the News event in the Center for Ethics Commons 102. Please click here for more information or to RSVP.

There will be a Zotero Workshop at 4:00 p.m. in room 314 of the Woodruff Library. Please click here to learn more.

Kahente Horn-Miller, New Sun Visiting Aboriginal Scholar (Canadian Studies, Carleton University), will give a talk titled "From Paintings to Power: The Mohawk Warrior Flag" at 5:00 p.m. in the anthropology building, room 206. Please see anthropology.emory.edu for more information.

Jasper Gaunt, curator of Greek and Roman Art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum, will lead a five-week study of the art of the ancient Greek vase. Tonight will be the third session from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. For more information, please click here.

The Emory Cinematheque series will continue its series of French New Waves: Classics and Redisoveries by hosting a screening of Breathless at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208.

The Emory Youth Symphony Orchestra will perform tonight at 8:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Please click here for a PDF of the program.

Thursday, February 18

Emory University School of Medicine's Grand Rounds talk will be held today from 7:00 to 8:00 a.m. in the Emory University Hospital Auditorium. Ryan Ford (assistant professor of medicine, division of digestive diseases, department of medicine, Emory University School of Medicine) will speak on "Hepatitis C: A Medical Revolution." Please see surgery.emory.edu to learn more.

The Emory WorkLife Resource Center will host "Fitness for Caregivers" from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the School of Medicine building, room 190-P. More information and registration is available here.

The Institute for Developing Nations will host "Research in Developing Nations: ELMO 101" from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in room 312 of the Woodruff Library. More information is available here and registration is available here.

Jenny Trinitapoli (sociology, the University of Chicago) will give a lecture on her book, Religion and AIDS in Africa, at 4:00 p.m. in the Lawrence P. and Ann Estes Klamon Room, Claudia Nance Rollins Building, Rollins School of Public Health. The lecture is sponsored by the Religion and Public Health Collaborative, the department of sociology, and the Center for AIDS Research. Please see ethics.emory.edu for more information.

There will be an AntiquiTEA event at 4:00 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's reception hall, level three, as Laura Somenzi, graduate student in the art history department, discusses a carved Roman acanthus relief from the first century A.D.

Patrick Colm Hogan (English, University of Connecticut) will speak on "Cognitive Aesthetics: Beauty, the Brain, and Virginia Woolf" at 4:00 p.m. in PAIS 290. For more information, please see the Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture.

The comparative literature department will host Benjamin Noys of the University of Chicester (UK) for a talk titled "The Ties that Bind: Life and Labor in Marx (and Derrida)." This talk will take place at 4:15 p.m. in White Hall 110.

The Aquinas Center of Theology will host a religious persecution panel featuring special guest Elizabeth Cassidy, director for policy and research, United States Commission on International and Religious Freedom. This panel will be held at 7:00 p.m. in the Woodruff Health Sciences Administration Building (WHSCAB).

Stefan Dolgert (Brock University, Canada) will give a lecture titled "For a Public Posthumanism" at 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall (Oxford College). For more information, please click here.

Friday, February 19

The Religion and Public Health Collaborative and the Center for Ethics will co-sponsor a workshop titled "Contentious Ethical Issues in Global Public Health" from 9:00 a.m. to noon in the Center for Ethics, room 102. This workshop will feature Jenny Trinitapoli (sociology, University of Chicago). For more information, please click here and please note RSVPs are required.

The Emory Center for Digital Scholarship will host a digital webinar on Open Access & OERs from 10:45 a.m. to noon. More information is available here.

Janet Gross (School of Medicine) and Gary Miller (Rollins School of Public Health) will give a talk titled "Rigor and Reproducibility" at noon in the Rollins Auditorium, Claudia Nance Rollins Building. This talk is part of the Rollins School of Public Health Grand Rounds series.

Tonio Andrade (history) will speak on "Gunpowder Warfare in Global History: The Military Pattern of the Chinese Past in Comparative Perspective" at 12:30 p.m. in Modern Languages 201. For more information, please see realc.emory.edu.

There will be a Literature is Alive @ Emory reading in the Emory Barnes & Noble Bookstore at 6:30 p.m. featuring Margaret Ross, Melissa Febos, Kalpana Narayanan, and Angela Davis Johnson. For more information, please visit this link.

Anthony Plog, trumpeter and composer, will present a masterclass from 5:15 to 6:45 p.m. in the Tharp Rehearsal Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. This masterclass is free and open to the public. Please see Music at Emory for more information.

Saturday, February 20

The Emory Cinematheque series will continue its series of French New Waves: Classics and Redisoveries by screening episodes 1-4 of Out 1 from 11:00 a.m to 7:45 p.m. in White Hall 208. There will be short breaks between each episode.

The Candler Concert Series will present the orchestral collective The Knights alongside violinst Gil Shaham at 8:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts.

Sunday, February 21

The Emory Cinematheque series will continue its series of French New Waves: Classics and Redisoveries by screening episodes 5-8 of Out 1 from noon to 8:00 p.m. in White Hall 208. There will be short breaks between each episode.

Elena Cholakova and William Ransom will perform a two piano concert at 4:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. A PDF of the program is available here.

Monday, February 22

The Emory Emeritus College Lunch Colloquium Series will continue as Carl C. Hug, Jr., anesthesiology and pharmacology, gives a talk on "Pain Management and Risks of Addiction." This event will be held in the Luce Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All are welcome to attend. However, attendees who opt for lunch must register on or before the Thursday prior to each colloquium.  The fee for lunch is $10.00 and it will be accepted at the door.  For more information about The Lunch Colloquium and to register, please visit emory.edu/emeritus.

Stacey Sinclair, assistant professor of psychology at Princeton University, will present "You Are Who You Know: How Ethnic Attitudes and Interpersonal Interactions Shape One Another" as part of the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference's Race and Difference Colloquium. This event will take place in the Jones Room at the Woodruff Library from noon to 1:30 p.m. Please RSVP here.

The Psychoanalytic Studies Program will host psychoanalyst and analytic supervisor Patricia Gherovici for a talk titled "Beautiful Bodies, Botched Bodies, More Perfect Bodies: On Being in a Body" at 4:30 p.m. in White Hall 111. Gherovici will also give a lunch workshop titled "Psychoanalysis in the Barrio" on Tuesday, February 23 at 11:45 a.m. in Callaway S221; if you would like to RSVP for the workshop, please email Inna Strizhevsky (istrizh@emory.edu) by Thursday, February 18.

The fifth Carlos Reads Book Club event of the spring 2016 semester will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Board Room, Level Two. Christine Perkell, professor of classics and Virgil scholar, will lead discussion on Virgil's The Aeneid. For more information on the book club, to reserve a space, or to see the full semester's offerings, please click here.

For more events at Emory, visit http://www.emory.edu/home/events.

ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Monday, February 15, 2016, Volume 16, Issue 23

ThoughtWork is a publication of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, which is supported by the Office of the Provost. This electronic newsletter list is moderated; replies are not automatically forwarded to the list of recipients. Please email aadam02@emory.edu with comments and calendar submissions. Calendar submissions are due 5:00pm the Wednesday before the week of the event. Dates and details of events on calendar are subject to change; please confirm with organizers before you attend.

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