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ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Forefront

New Global Vision Lays Out Plan for Students, Faculty, Institution

The Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives (formerly the Office of International Affairs) and the Global Strategy Development Taskforce have developed A Global Vision for Emory, a set of strategies that will serve as a blueprint for Emory's global engagement over the next five years. This living document lays out a plan to equip students to meet the opportunities and challenges of an increasingly interconnected world; empower faculty to lead and influence global scholarship, research, and teaching; and position Emory as a university known for its global impact. The full list of strategic initiatives is available here, along with a link to the plan in full. Progress on some of the plan's major initiatives has already been made, most notably with the launch of Global Services this fall. Broad consultation with the university community will continue as this plan continues to be implemented.

More information on this initiative is available at global.emory.edu.

From Excellence to Eminence

Recent Faculty Achievements in the Sciences

Shipra Arya (Surgery) has been awarded a one-year Surgical Outcomes Clube Research Fellowship, which she plans to use to investigate the effectiveness of vascular surgical interventions in the elderly, perioperative decision-making, and healthcare resource utilization.

Albert Padwa (Chemistry, Emeritus) has been selected as a 2014 Senior Scientist Mentor by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. This award, granted to emeritus faculty in the chemical sciences, provides a $20,000 grant in support of undergraduate research conducted under the supervision of the emeritus faculty member.

Heard on Campus

The Malala Effect

The Malala effect points to a rhetorical process whereby configurations of exceptionality are bound by composite images of repressed Muslim women and storylines that turn on simple oppositions, such as freedom and constraint, and repression and resistance. A comparative analysis of the elite international media coverage of the Taliban’s assassination attempt against Malala Yousafzai and the Afghan and Pakistani civilian casualties caused by NATO-led drone strikes reveals the relative inattention to international stories that implicate the U.S. as a violent actor. . . . A study from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism at the City University of London reports that U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan have killed between 411 and 884 civilians, 168 to 197 of them children. In contrast, then, to the unnamed dehumanized children in Afghanistan and Pakistan killed by drones, Malala Yousafzai is not a nameless casualty of war. She is not stripped of biographical specificity or legal personhood. The contrast between representations of Malala and the anonymous children killed by drones demonstrates the high stakes and political investments in controlling accounts of violence against children.

—Wendy S. Hesford, Professor of English, The Ohio State University, from her talk, “Exceptional Children: Children’s Human Rights Rhetoric and Recognition Scenes,” December 4, 2013, presented by the Writing Program Speaker Series and the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Resources for Faculty

Fulbright Workshops for Faculty and Staff

The Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives (GSI) and the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence (CFDE) are partnering to host a day of free Fulbright information sessions on Monday, March 16 for faculty and staff interested in applying for Fulbright grants. This year's expanded programming is organized by GSI's recently announced Global Fellowship Faculty Support resource, which also provides individualized assistance to faculty seeking international research and teaching experiences.

Cate McCraw, a program officer with the Fulbright Scholar Program, will be on campus to give a presentation on Fulbright Scholar grants for U.S. faculty and professionals. In addition, there are two new offerings this year: brief one-on-one meetings for faculty who have questions about the process and a Fulbright alumni panel discussion.

The following sessions are open to faculty and staff:

  • One-on-one meetings with McCraw will run from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. in the CFDE (216 Woodruff Library). To sign up for a time slot to meet with McCraw, submit a short abstract of your project (and a draft proposal if you have one) to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu), associate director of the CFDE, by Friday, March 6. The description should be no more than two pages and include a brief bio and contact information.

  • A presentation and question-and-answer session on Fulbright Scholar grants will take place from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. Boxed lunches will be served. Please RSVP by Thursday, March 12.

  • Past Fulbright grant recipients will share their experiences and take questions about putting together a successful application during a panel discussion from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the Jones Room. Panelists will include Joe Crespino (History), Jenny Foster (Nursing), and Lee Pasackow (Business Librarian). Registration is not required.

For more information, please click here or email Kevin Kelly (kevin.kelly@emory.edu), assistant director of the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives.

New to the Faculty

Nathan Jui, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Nathan Jui completed his PhD in chemistry at Princeton University (2011). Previously, Jui was an NIH postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to developing valuable chemical methods, Jui's primary research focus is applying the power of synthetic chemistry to the study and treatment of cancer. His articles have been published in ScienceOrganic LettersChemical Communications, and the Journal of the American Chemical Society, among other journals.​

Events This Week

Monday, February 2

The annual Feast of Words celebration of Emory authors and editors of books published in the previous year will be held today from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Barnes & Noble @ Emory. For more information, please see this link.

At 4:00 p.m., Nicky Cullum (Professor, School of Nursing, Midwifery, and Social Work at the University of Manchester) will deliver the Ada Fort Lecture in the School of Nursing. For more information or to register, please see nursing.emory.edu.

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 5:00 p.m. with "I Am a Moon" by Zhu Yi, and at 8:00 p.m. with "Whaler" by Snehal Desai. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Saturday, February 7 at 7:30 p.m. ("Assimilation," Jack Dalton); Sunday, February 8 at 7:30 p.m. ("Tombs of the Vanishing Indian," Marie Clements); and Monday, February 9 at 7:30 p.m. ("Total Power Exchange," Edith Freni). Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

At 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall, Oxford College, Paolo Gualdi will give a piano concert. For more information, please click here.

Tuesday, February 3

At 8:00 a.m., Judy Fridovich-Keil (Professor of Human Genetics, Emory School of Medicine) will speak on "Classic Galactosemia: New Insights into Old Problems." This event will take place in the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building - 3rd Floor - Room 300. This lecture is part of the Genetics Seminar Series.

The Psychoanalytic Studies Program will host a Lunch and Lecture event as Julie Gaillard (graduate student in the Department of French and Italian) speaks on "Jean-Francois Lyotard's Libidinal Aesthetics - the Case of Cinema." This event will take place in Callaway C202 from 11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided; please RSVP to Gina Stamm at gstamm@emory.edu by Monday, February 2.

From 3:30 to 5:00 p.m., Carolyn Livingston (Emory Campus Life) will give a talk titled "Interviewing and Negotiating on the Non-Academic Job Market" in DUC E338. To register, please click here.

The Emory University Faculty Council will host the twentieth Distinguished Faculty Lecture today as Frans B. M. de Waal (Charles Howard Candler Professor of Psychology; Director of Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center) speaks on "Evolution of the Social Mind: Primate Politics, Culture, and Morality." This lecture will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the Winship Ballroom, Dobbs University Center. A reception will follow.

At 4:00 p.m., there will be a discussion forum on "Ebola, 'A Neoliberal Disease?': Economic, Political, and Social Impact in Liberia." This event will be held in room 290 of the Psychology and Interdisciplinary Sciences (PAIS) Building. This discussion forum will be the second of seven on Ebola that will be held throughout the semester. For more information, including the names of the speakers and the dates and topics of future forums, please click here.

Christine Mullen Kreamer (deputy director and chief curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art and curator of African Cosmos: Stellar Arts) will give a African Cosmos Lecture at 7:30 p.m. in the Michael C. Carlos Museum's Reception Hall, Level Three. Her talk will focus on the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy and its intersection with both traditional and contemporary African arts. Please click here to learn more.

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 10:00 p.m. with "Trials with Brownies" by Snehal Desai. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

Wednesday, February 4

Brian Stone (School of City and Regional Planning, Georgia Institute of Technology) will give a lecture titled "Adapting to Climate Change in Cities: The Party's Not Over But It's Getting Wet (And Hot)." This lecture will be held at 3:00 p.m. in White Hall 207. For more information, please see the website for the Department of Environmental Sciences.

The Emory Cinematheque series will continue with a screening of Zombieland at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208. For more information, please see filmstudies.emory.edu.

Thursday, February 5

Emory University School of Medicine's Grand Rounds talk will be held today from 7:00 to 8:00 a.m. in the Emory University Hospital Auditorium. Karim J. Halazun (Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine) will speak on "Liver Transplantation for HCC: Looking Beyond Size and Number." Please see surgery.emory.edu to learn more.

Cheryl Ball (editor of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy; associate professor of digital publishing studies at West Virginia University) will be on campus Thursday and Friday to present a series of events. On Thursday, February 5 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Ball will discuss "Building a Digital Portfolio" in White Hall 200. At 6:00 p.m. that same day, she will deliver a public lecture on "The Asymptotic Relationship Between Digital Humanities and Computers and Writing" in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. For more information on these events or to register for the multimodal assessment workshop, please click here.

There will be a public scholarship event on "Writing and Placing Op-Eds" from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law Dorothy Brown will moderate a discussion about OpEds. Carol Anderson (African American Studies), Lynne Huffer (Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies), and Nathan McCall (African American Studies, former Washington Post reporter) will speak. Please RSVP to Joyce Alson (joycelyn.alston@emory.edu) and click here to learn more.

The next installment in the AntiquiTEA series will be held today at 4:00 p.m. in the Michael C. Carlos Museum, Reception Hall, as Annie Shanley (PhD candidate, Art History) discusses Sopdet, an Egyptian goddess representing Sirius, the dog star, whose appearance on the horizon in late summar signaled the coming of the annual inundation of the Nile.

Bradd Shore (Anthropology) will give a talk titled "Look Again: Anamorphic Projection and Social Theory in Shakespeare" at 4:00 p.m. in room 290 of the PAIS building. For more information, please see cmbc.emory.edu.

David Suchoff (Professor of English, Colby College) will give the second Maximilian Aue Memorial Lecture today at 4:00 p.m. in White Hall 103. His talk is titled "The Hidden Rabe: Kafka's Openings and Beckett's Cage." For more information, please see german.emory.edu.

Eric Varner (Art History) will give a talk titled "Golden Excess: Nero's Portraits, the Cult of Luxury, and the Rise of the Second Sophistic" today at 4:30 p.m. in the Tate Room of the Carlos Museum. This talk is part of the Program in Ancient Mediterranean Studies colloquium series.

The Emory Veterans Association and the Georgia Humanities Council will sponsor a lecture by Colonel Jack H. Jacobs, Vietnam veteran and author of two books. This event will take place in Cox Hall Ballroom at 6:00 pm. For more information, please see the calendar for Founders Week.

At 7:30 p.m., Timothy Snyder (Housum Professor of History, Yale University) will speak on "The Holocaust as Political History" in the Oxford Presentation Auditorium of the Oxford Road Building. A reception will follow. Snyder will also facilitate a faculty-graduate student seminar titled "Ukraine: A War of Truth" at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 6 in White Hall 206. For more information on these events, please see the website for The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies.

At 8:00 p.m., the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company will perform in the Dance Studio of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see the page for the Flora Glenn Candler Concert Series. The company will also perform on Friday, February 6 at 8:00 p.m. (performance sold out) and Saturday, February 7 at 8:00 p.m.

Friday, February 6

Cheryl Ball (editor of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy; associate professor of digital publishing studies at West Virginia University) will be on campus Thursday and Friday to present a series of events.On Friday, February 6 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., she will host a multimodal assessment workshop in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library (registration required). Later that afternoon, from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m., also in the Jones Room, she will facilitate a workshop on "Designing Multimodal Assignments." For more information on these events or to register for the multimodal assessment workshop, please click here.

The Center for Ethics presents Marshall Duke (Psychology), who will deliver one of the Good Life Lecture Series on "Resilience and Happiness: Living Strong, Living Well, Living Good." This event will take place at 5:00 p.m. in the Center for Ethics Room 102. For more information, contact Jason Hsu, chsu8@emory.edu.

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 7:30 p.m. with "The Bird House" by Diane Glancy. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

Saturday, February 7

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 7:30 p.m. with "Assimilation" by Jack Dalton. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

At 8:00 p.m., Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra will perform in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see the page for the Flora Glenn Candler Concert Series.

Sunday, February 8

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 7:30 p.m. with "Tombs of the Vanishing Indian" by Marie Clements. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

Monday, February 9

As part of QuanTM's Learning Analytics Speaker Series, Ryan Baker (Teachers College, Columbia University) will be giving a talk titled "Towards Long-Term and Actionable Prediction of Student Outcomes Using Automated Detectors of Engagement and Affect." This talk will take place from noon to 1:30 in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. For those who RSVP by February 5, lunch will be provided. For more information, please see quantitative.emory.edu/events.

There will be an Archives Research Program speaker series event titled "Teaching with Archives" at 4:00 p.m. in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library. Donna Troka (Center for Faculty Development and Excellence) will describe her experience planning a syllabus and designing assignments using archival material, which led to the successful creation of the exhibit "Let's Talk About Sex." Please click here to learn more.

At 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall, Oxford College, Bobbi Patterson (professor of pedagogy) will give a talk titled "Culturing Compassion." For more information, please click here.

Theater Emory's series of staged readings, titled Global Voices, will continue at 7:30 p.m. with "Total Power Exchange" by Edith Freni. These readings will take place in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are requested; the link to reserve for any of the performances may be found here.

For more events at Emory, visit http://www.emory.edu/home/events.

ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Monday, February 2, 2015, Volume 15, Issue 21

ThoughtWork is a publication of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, which is supported by the Office of the Provost. This electronic newsletter list is moderated; replies are not automatically forwarded to the list of recipients. Please email aadam02@emory.edu with comments and calendar submissions. Calendar submissions are due 5:00pm the Wednesday before the week of the event. Dates and details of events on calendar are subject to change; please confirm with organizers before you attend.

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