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ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Forefront

Legal Scholars Show That Political Attack Ads Influence Judges

In this year’s election season culminating in voting day tomorrow, November 4, more than $1 billion have been spent on some 2 million ads around the country. According to a study by two Emory law professors, television attack ads may have an unexpected side effect: they may influence decisions in criminal cases. In the study, law professors Joanna Shepherd and Michael S. Kang looked at the correlation between television attack ads and rulings against criminal defendants in the context of state supreme court judicial election campaigns. Ads aired for these types of campaigns tend to target justices as being “soft on crime.” The study found that the more TV ads aired during judicial elections season, the less likely justices were to vote in favor of criminal defendants. The study also discussed the role of the recent United States Supreme Court Citizens United case and discovered that justices in states with newly-removed bans on corporate and union spending in elections were less likely to vote in favor of criminal defendants than they were before the decision, indicating the central importance of money in election campaigns. The study, which was cited in the New York Times and featured in National Public Radio's program "On the Media," was supported by the American Constitution Society. The study's website is available here: http://skewedjustice.org/.

From Excellence to Eminence

Recent Faculty Awards and Honors

Rafi Ahmed (Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Microbiology and Immunology) and Chris Larsen (dean of Emory University School of Medicine, professor of surgery in Emory University School of Medicine, affiliate scientist at Yerkes National Primate Research Center) have both been elected to the Institute of Medicine's new class of 70 leading health scientists and 10 foreign associates. For more information on this honor, please click here.

David Blumenthal (Jay & Leslie Cohen Professor of Judaic Studies in the Department of Religion, Emory College) is the subject of a recently published book, David R. Blumenthal: Living with God and Humanity. This book is seventh in the "Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers" series. Please click here to learn more.

Elizabeth Downes (associate clinical professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing) has been inducted as a Fellow in the National League for Nursing's Academy of Nursing Education. Fellows are nurse educators who have made sustained and significant contributions to nursing education. Please see this link for more information.

Richie Hofmann (Creative Writing Fellow, Emory College) has won the Beatrice Hawley Award for Poetry. This award includes publication of a book-length poetry manuscript and a cash prize. Hofmann's first book of poetry will be published in November 2015. More information is available here.

Jeffrey Lesser (Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History, chair of Department of History, Emory College) and Eric L. Goldstein (associate professor of history, Emory College) have both contributed chapters in an anthology that has won the National Jewish Book Award. Please click here to learn more.

Sean Stowell (assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Emory University School of Medicine) has been given the National Institutes of Health's Director's Early Independence Award. This five-year research grant is valued at $1.25 million and is given to a small number of exceptional early-career scientists. For more information on Stowell's work and this award, please click here.

Heard on Campus

Idealism in Corporate Climates

I started to get nostalgic for my time at BP and thought, "You know what? I think working in business is really where it’s at. I had had a nine-year run in this company who really cared and really supported [environmental responsibility] and really got it." And then what happened? On April 20th, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, killing eleven men and wreaking environmental and economic havoc around the Gulf and beyond. And then, as many of you will recall, this very different BP emerged in the aftermath of that disaster. . . . It totally didn’t resemble the BP that I had loved for nine years. But I thought I’d known it so well. My first thought was, of course, denial: That’s so not my BP. It couldn’t be. Wrong company. Then I thought, Or was it? Did I miss something? Did I miss a memo? So it really made me question what had I done for the previous nine years. . . . I started talking to a lot of the friends and peers I’d gotten to know over the years who were doing comparable work deep inside other companies, just talking to them about their work, particularly when things go wrong. . . . Like friends who worked at The Gap after the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, and friends who work at tech companies after their users have been thrown in jail. Talking to all these people, I realized that I was part of this global invisible army of people, who I came to call corporate idealists, who believe that business can be a force for good in the world, but know that there are so many risks and challenges to doing that but are committed to that sometimes Sisyphean vow.

-- Christine Bader, visiting scholar at Columbia University and an advisor on corporate responsibility, from her talk, “The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: Girl Meets Oil,” September 17, 2014, sponsored by the Center for Ethics

Resources for Faculty

Mini-Grants Available from Emory Open Education Initiative

Emory Libraries and Information Technologies (LITS) is offering mini-grants in the amount of $1,000 each. These grants are intended to encourage faculty and instructors to create and use open educational resources and library materials to support student learning in their courses. The grants may be used to create or compile open educational resources, library materials, or faculty-generated content to be used in courses taught fall 2015 or spring 2016 in lieu of textbooks.

These grants are open to all full-time faculty, both lecture- and tenure-track. Both individual faculty members and faculty working as teams may apply, but only one application per faculty member/team will be considered. A maximum of 10 mini-grants will be awarded for fall 2015 or spring 2016 classes.

Accepted faculty members will be required to attend three half-day immersion trainings scheduled for February 6, February 13, and February 20, 2015, from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. Applications are due on November 14, 2014 (5:00 p.m. EST), and may be accessed via this link. Applicants will be notified of the decision by Friday, December 12, 2014.

If you would like to know more before you apply, the EOEI will hold a one-hour brown bag overview on Wednesday, November 5, 2014, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Interested parties may attend this event either in-person or virtually to ask questions. The in-person location will be held in the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, Room 303F, Conference Room, Third Floor, Woodruff Library. Alternatively, it will be possible to log in on your computer using Adobe Connect. Log into Adobe Connect using the Guest field by typing your name and clicking Enter Room. You do not need to enter in your Emory credentials. You may dial in using the conference number 404-251-0558 and using participant code 111762.

For more information on open educational resources, please click here. For information about the 2014-2015 Emory Open Education Initiative Cohort, please click here.

New to the Faculty

Shipra Arya, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovasculary Therapy; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health)

Shipra Arya received her MD from All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India. She then completed her Master of Science in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, her general surgery residency at Creighton University Medical Center, and her fellowship in vascular surgery at the University of Michigan. Her clinical interests are aortic aneurysmal disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal/mesenteric arterial disease and vascular access. Her research interests include health services research and healthcare resource utilization, with a specific focus on quality and effectiveness of vascular procedures in frail and elderly population.

Events This Week

Monday, November 3

Provost Claire Sterk will hold a Faculty Salon in the Center for Ethics from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. All faculty are invited. For more information, please click here.

There will be a screening of ART21: Art in the Twenty-First Century at 6:00 p.m. in the Visual Arts Building. For more information, please see arthistory.emory.edu.

Theater Emory's Pinter Fest will continue with a screening of Pinter's The Caretaker at 7:00 p.m. in the Theater Lab of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are required; to register or for more information, please click here.

At 7:30 p.m. at Oxford College, Julie Coucheron and Will Ransom will perform a Four-Hand Piano Concert in Williams Hall. For more information, please see the Oxford Studies series website.

Tuesday, November 4

"Success with Stress: A Stress Management Workshop Series" will continue today with "Self-Compassion: The Art of Loving You" at noon in the School of Medicine, Room 190P. Events will be held weekly until November 18, 2014. Please click here to learn more or to register.

In preparation for Henry Jenkins's visit on Monday, November 10 (see entry below), the Critical Media Literacy Group will host a discussion of readings by Jenkins from noon to 1:00 p.m. in Rich 103. For more information or a copy of the readings, please email Tanine Allison at tanine.allison@emory.edu.

As part of the South Asia Seminar Series, Deepika Bahri (Associate Professor of English) will speak on "Postcolonial Biology: Empire, Psyche, Flesh" at 4:00 p.m. in Bowden Hall 323. For more information, please see history.emory.edu.

At 7:30 p.m., there will be a screening of David Lebrun's new documentary film Dance of the Maize God. The film explores the royal life and rich mythology of the Maya through imagery on vases, as well as the tangled issues involved in the collection and study of works of art. There will be a conversation following the film featuring Lebrun and assistant curator of Art of the Americas Laura Wingfield. More information is available in the Michael C. Carlos Museum's calendar.

Wednesday, November 5

The Emory Open Education Initiative (EOEI) program will be holding a brown bag info session today in the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Interested parties may attend this event either in-person or virtually, via Adobe Connect. For more information, please see the Resources for Faculty section of this publication.

A Pinter Kaleidoscope, part of Theater Emory's Pinter Fest, will be performed tonight at 7:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. in the Mary Gray Munroe Theater, Dobbs University Center. Tonight is pay-what-you-can night. There will also be performances on Thursday, November 6 at 7:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.; Friday, November 7 at 7:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.; Saturday, November 8 at 7:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.; and Sunday, November 9 at 2:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Please see the website of A Pinter Kaleidoscope to learn more.

The Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces in Polish Cinema film series will continue with a screening of The Wedding at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208. For more information, please click here.

At 7:30 p.m. at Oxford College, there will be a screening of Good Ol' Freda, part of the Southern Circuit Film Series. For more information, please see the Oxford Studies series website.

An event titled "Whatever is to Come" will be held tonight to celebrate the publication of The Letters of Samuel Beckett 1957-1965, Volume 3. "Whatever is to Come" will be held at 8:00 p.m. in the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Emerson Concert Hall, and will feature Barry McGovern (Irish actor and interpreter of Samuel Beckett's writings, Donna and Marvin Schwartz Artist in Residence), Carolyn Cook (Theatre du Rêve, Atlanta's French Theatre Company), Robert Shaw-Smith (Arís, Atlanta's Celtic Theatre Company), and Brenda Bynum (Emory University). For more information, please see the Letters of Samuel Beckett Project.

Thursday, November 6

At 12:15 p.m., Minsu Kim (Assistant Professor, Department of Physics) will speak on "To Grow or Not To Grow: Survival Strategies of Bacteria To Cope With Hardship" in the Whitehead Building, Ground Floor Auditorium. Please see biochem.emory.edu for more information.

Anandi Salinas, graduate student in the Department of Religion, will introduce an eleventh-century sandstone sculpture of Vishnu sleeping on the Cosmic Ocean and discuss its relationship to time in Hinduism in the next installment of the AntiquiTEA series. This event will be held at 4:00 p.m. in the Reception Hall (Level Three) of the Carlos Museum.

The Institute of African Studies presents Emily Callaci (African History, University of Wisconsin-Madison), who will discuss "'Street Archives' of the Socialist City: Dar es Salaam's Pulp Fiction Publishing Industry, 1967-1985." This event will take place in Bowden Hall 323. For more information or a copy of the pre-circulated paper, contact Nathan Suhr-Sytsma, nathan.e.suhr-sytsma@emory.edu.

At 7:30 p.m. at Oxford College, Samantha Nutt (award-winning humanitarian, bestselling author, and acclaimed public speaker) will give a talk in Williams Hall. For more information, please see the Oxford Studies series website.

Friday, November 7

The Candler School of Theology's Annual Women's Forum ("Honoring the Women of Candler Past, Present, and Future") will be held today from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in Candler School of Theology RARB 102. This event is part of the Candler Centennial Celebration.

There will be a panel discussion on the state of religious freedom for Tibetans living inside Tibet at 4:00 p.m. in White Hall 207. The panel, titled "Religious Freedom in Tibet: Perspectives from a Legal Scholar, a Writer, and an Activist," will feature Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im (Senior Fellow of Emory's Center for the Study of Law and Religion), Bhuchung D. Sonam (writer, poet, and translator based in Dharamsala, India), and Tenzin Dorjee (former Executive Director of Students for a Free Tibet International). For more information, please email Tsering Choedon at tchoedo@emory.edu.

The Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces in Polish Cinema film series will continue with a screening of The Saragossa Manuscript at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208. For more information, please click here.

Saturday, November 8

Theater Emory's Pinter Fest will continue with staged readings of Pinter's A Kind of Alaska and Family Voices, directed by Tim McDonough, at 7:00 p.m. in the Theater Lab, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Reservations are required; you may RSVP through this link.

"No Strings Attached: 20th Anniversary Concert" will be held at 8:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. A PDF of the program is available here.

Sunday, November 9

At 4:30 p.m., Donald Baker (University of British Columbia) will speak on "The Transformation of Religion in 20th-Century Korea" in White Hall 111. The Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures department has more information.

Monday, November 10

Henry Jenkins (Provost's Professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts, and Education at the University of Southern California) will give a talk titled "Could This Be What Democracy Looks Like?: Participatory Politics, Transmedia Mobilization, and The Civic Imagination" at 4:00 p.m. in White Hall 208. A reception will follow. For more information, please see filmstudies.emory.edu.

The Disability Studies Speaker Series presents Margaret Price (Spelman College) speaking on "Transient Spaces and the Traces They Leave: A Meditation on Practicing Access and the Future of Disability Studies." This event will take place at 4:00 pm in Anthropology Room 303. For more information, click here.

There will be a screening of ART21: Art in the Twenty-First Century at 6:00 p.m. in the Visual Arts Building. For more information, please see arthistory.emory.edu.

The fourth Carlos Reads Book Club event of the year will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Board Room, Level Two. The discussion will be led by Karen Stolley, professor and chair of Emory's Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and will focus on the Quiché Maya book of creation known as the Popol Vuh. More information, including how to RSVP for this or future events, may be found here.

For more events at Emory, visit http://www.emory.edu/home/events.

ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Monday, November 3, 2014, Volume 15, Issue 11

ThoughtWork is a publication of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, which is supported by the Office of the Provost. This electronic newsletter list is moderated; replies are not automatically forwarded to the list of recipients. Please email aadam02@emory.edu with comments and calendar submissions. Calendar submissions are due 5:00pm the Wednesday before the week of the event. Dates and details of events on calendar are subject to change; please confirm with organizers before you attend.

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