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ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Forefront

February CFDE Workshops on Teaching, Grant-Seeking

This February, the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence will sponsor two workshops open to all faculty.

"Pedagogical Strategies for Conflict in the Classroom" with Ellen Ott Marshall, Associate Professor of Theology, Candler: Friday, February 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. In this session, participants will explore both proactive and reactive strategies for working constructively with disagreement in the classroom. Consider the costs and opportunities that disagreement poses in the learning environment and then use a case study to discuss pedagogically constructive responses to conflict.

"An Introduction to Fulbright Scholar Grants for US Faculty and Professionals" with Andrew Reiss, Assistant Director of Outreach at the Institute of International Education, which administers the Fulbright Scholar Program: Wednesday, February 15, from noon to 2:00 p.m. Individual meetings with Reiss will precede the group presentation and Q&A. More information and instructions for registration are available at this link.

From Excellence to Eminence

Ransom Named Top Classical Music Innovator

William Ransom (Mary Emerson Professor of Piano) has been named one of the "30 Innovators of the Year" in classical music by Musical America, a prominent classical music publication. In addition to his faculty duties, Ransom also serves as artistic director of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta, artistic director of the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival in North Carolina, and the artistic director of the Juneau Jazz and Classics Festival in Alaska. Ransom also is overseeing the establishment of the Rebecca Katz-Doft Chamber Music Foundation, designed to permanently fund a string quartet in residence at Emory University, and recently released a solo CD, Listening to Memories. For more information, please visit this link.

Heard on Campus

Moral Compasses in the Age of Trump

There’s lots of analysis about what has happened. It’s race, it’s class, it’s gender – someone will say it’s the history of slavery that’s still haunting us, the systematic disenfranchisement of millions of Americans who are either imprisoned or currently disenfranchised, unable to vote because they’ve been in prison or they’re going to be disenfranchised by voter ID laws. It’s racism rearing its ugly head. . . . No, someone will say, it’s class. It’s the Rust Belt. It’s working class white men who never went to college, who had factory jobs and now have nothing, nobody’s paying attention to them and they’re pissed off. No, someone else will say, it’s gender. It’s misogyny. Misogyny’s at work here, that deep, visceral hate of Hillary is misogyny. Nobody really cares about Trump, that he’s a . . . sexual predator. And then someone else will say, “Well, wait a minute, a lot of women voted for Trump. How do you explain that?” And someone else will say, with regard to the non-college-educated Rust Belt voters, “Lots of educated voters voted for him, too. How do you explain that?” And someone else will say, with regard to race, “Yes, there’s no question the black vote has been systematically suppressed, but does that explain everything?” And someone else, probably a feminist, will say, “No, of course not, we need an intersectional analysis.” And so on the conversation goes. We know this conversation. And this kind of conversation is important, and I hope that we can have that conversation today, but I just want to introduce something slightly different, which is this ethical question: How are we to live in an age where we feel that there is no moral compass? And I want to suggest that there maybe never was one. Nietzsche says that he denies morality the way he denies alchemy. He denies their premises. People might behave morally or immorally, but not for the reasons that they claim. So was there a moral compass in the time of slavery? Yes, but we might now deny the premises of that morality.

--Lynne Huffer, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, during the panel discussion, “The Future of America,” November 16, 2016, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Workshop in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies

Resources for Faculty

Call for Nominations: 2017 Jefferson Award

The Thomas Jefferson Award, named and endowed by the Robert Earl McConnell Foundation, is currently seeking nominations for the 2017 award. The Jefferson Award is presented at commencement and honors a member of the faculty or staff for significant service to Emory University through personal activities, influence, and leadership, usually over the course of many years.

Any Emory University employee may make a nomination of a current Emory faculty or staff member by sending an original letter of nomination and the nominee's CV or resume to Tom Jenkins at thomas.jenkins@emory.edu. The nomination letter should be directed to the attention of the Chair and Members of the Jefferson Award Selection Committee. Materials should be submitted by 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 9, 2017.

For more information on this award, please visit this link.

New to the Faculty

David Resha, Assistant Professor of Film Studies, Oxford College

David Resha completed his PhD in film studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2010). Before joining the faculty at Emory, Resha held a position at Birmingham-Southern College. Resha's primary scholarly focus is documentary film history and aesthetics. He is author of the book The Cinema of Errol Morris, and his articles have been published leading journals including Screening the Past and Quarterly Review of Film and Video.

Events This Week

Monday, January 23

Tingting Chen will speak on "'The General History of China' and the Earliest Translations of Chinese Fiction into English" at noon in Modern Languages 201. For more information, please see realc.emory.edu.

Justin Quinn, associate professor of American and English literature at Charles University (Prague), will speak on "Irish Poetry in the World" in the Kemp Malone Library at 4:00 p.m. For more information, please visit english.emory.edu.

Cory Labrecque (Laval University) will give the 2017 Consistent Ethic of Life Lecture on the topic, "The Seamless Garment of Life: Exploring the Catholic Church's Ethic from Birth to Death." This lecture will be held at 7:00 p.m. in the Rita Anne Rollins Building, room 252. For more information or to RSVP, please visit this link.

The first Carlos Reads Book Club event of the spring 2017 semester will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlos Museum's Board Room, Level Two. Subha Xavier, assistant professor of French and Francophone literature, will begin the series by leading discussion on The Suns of Independence. For more information on the book club, to reserve a space, or to see the full semester's offerings, please click here.

Tenor Bradley Howard, director of voal studies, and pianist Will Ransom, professor of music, will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall (Oxford College). For more information, please visit this link.

Tuesday, January 24

The Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture will host a lunch conversation with Donald Tuten, associate professor and chair, Spanish & Portuguese, and Alena Esposito, reseach scientist, department of psychology, on the topic "Sociocultural and Psychological Perspectives on Bilingualism" at noon. For more information, including how to register, please visit cmbc.emory.edu.

As part of the pharmacology seminar series, Anna Kenney, associate professor of pediatrics, will speak on "Regulation of Radiation Resistance and Mitochondrial Morphology in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Medulloblastoma" at noon in 5052 Rollins Research Center.

The Institute for Developing Nations will host "ELMO: Real Time Quantitative and Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis for Your Field Research" from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. in room 312 of the Woodruff Library.

Daylanne English (English, Macalester College) will give a lecture titled "'Swing Low, Time to Move On': Afrofuturism and the Afterlife," at 4:00 p.m. in 207 Candler Library. A reception will follow. This event is part of the department of African American Studies's Futures in African American Literature and Culture series.

Justin Quinn, associate professor of American and English literature at Charles University (Prague), will give a poetry reading in the Living Room of the Oxford Road Building at 5:30 p.m. For more information, please visit english.emory.edu.

The first in a series of public events in support of the exhibition "Still Raising Hell: The Art, Activism, and Archives of Camille Billops and James V. Hatch," will be held tonight at 6:00 p.m. at The Gathering Spot (384 Northyards Blvd NW #190, Atlanta, GA, 30313). Artist Fahamau Pecou will host interSessions, which will also feature hip-hop artist Monie Love and dancer and choreographer T. Lang. For more information, please visit this link.

Wednesday, January 25

At 1:00 p.m., Jennifer Harvey (religion, Drake University) will speak on "From Ferguson to Standing Rock: Religious Faith, Righteous Feminists, and Holy Fire" in room 252 of Candler's Rita Anne Rollins Building. To RSVP, please visit this link. At 3:00 p.m., Harvey will speak on "Charting Shifting Waters: Race (and Whiteness) in the Classroom." This event will take place in the Candler School of Theology Building RARB 102. To RSVP, please visit this link.

The first Neuroethics and Neuroscience in the News event of the semester will be held from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Center for Ethics room 162 on the study that inspired the headline "This Calculator Can Predict Your Risk of Developing Psychotic Disorders." Though the event is full, if you would like to be put on the waitlist, please RSVP to akear@emory.edu by Monday, January 23.

Heather Willis Allen (French and Italian, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Emory PhD alumnus) will speak on "Moving Beyond Communicative Language Teaching: Anchoring Collegiate Lower-Division Foreign Language Instruction in Literacy Development" at 4:15 p.m. in Callaway C202. For more information, please visit this link.

The Emory Phi Beta Kappa society will host William Bialek, Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics at Princeton University, for a talk titled "The Galilean Imperative: A Physicist's Search for Simplicity" at 5:30 p.m. in Math & Science Center E208. A reception will follow. For more information, please visit this link.

The Emory Cinematheque series, which will coincide with the UCLA Film & Television Archive Festival of Preservation Tour this semester, will continue at 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 208 with a screening of The Long Voyage Home.

Thursday, January 26

Library & Information Technology Services will host "Canvas 101 - Online Only Session" at 9:00 a.m. at this link.

Research Engagement Services will host the final in three sessions on the topic Data Visualization Tips and Tricks from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. in Woodruff Library 312. For more information, please email Katie Rawson at katie.rawson@emory.edu.

The Emory Phi Beta Kappa society will host William Bialek, Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics at Princeton University, for a technical lecture titled "Flocks of Birds, Families of Proteins, and Networks of Neurons" at 4:00 p.m. in White Hall 205. For more information, please visit this link.

At 4:00 p.m., David G. Addiss (science advisor, Children Without Worms, Task Force for Global Health) will hold a clinical ethics seminar on "The Prophetic Voice of Compassion: Implications for Global Health Ethics" in the Center for Ethics seminar room. For more information, please visit ethics.emory.edu.

As part of the AntiquiTEA series, Julianne Cheng (graduate student, art history) will discuss ways in which Reflectance Trans-mission Imaging (rti) has helped to uncover elaborate preliminary sketches on works by the late archaic Athenian cup-painter, Onesimos, in the Carlos Collections. This event will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the Michael C. Carlos Museum's Ackerman Hall, Level Three.

The 2017 Creativity & Arts Awards will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts's Chace Upper Lobby. Please RSVP by emailing creativity@emory.edu.

Jenifer Neils, editor of the book The Parthenon From Antiquity to the Present, will deliver alecture titled "Noblest Imagines: The Parthenon Marbles from 1436 to the Present" at 7:30 p.m. in the Michael C. Carlos Museum's Ackerman Hall, Level Three. For more information, please visit this link.

Friday, January 27

No events are scheduled for today.

Saturday, January 28

Violamania! will be held at 8:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see Music at Emory.

Sunday, January 29

The Emory Young Artist Piano Competition Final Concert will be held at 7:00 p.m. in the Emerson Concert Hall, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please see Music at Emory.

Monday, January 30

The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference's Race and Difference Colloquium Series will continue at noon with Carla Shedd (sociology and African American Studies, Columbia University) speaking on "When Protection Becomes Punishment: Policing the Public (Schools) in an Unequal City." Colloquiums take place in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library; please click here to RSVP.

There will be an EndNote Introduction at 2:00 p.m. in room 312 of the Woodruff Library. For more information, please visit this link.

The Consulate General of France in Atlanta and the department of French & Italian will host a lecture (in English) by linguist Bernard Cerquiglini on the topic "A Joint History of the English and French Languages," at 4:15 p.m. in White Hall 207. For more information, please visit this link.

Musician David Leinweber, associate professor of history, Oxford College, will perform music from and about the British Isles at 7:30 p.m. in Williams Hall (Oxford College). For more information, please visit this link.

For more events at Emory, visit http://www.emory.edu/home/events.

ThoughtWork: Emerging Knowledge and News in Emory's Intellectual Community

Monday, January 23, 2016, Volume 17, Issue 20

ThoughtWork is a publication of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, which is supported by the Office of the Provost. This electronic newsletter list is moderated; replies are not automatically forwarded to the list of recipients. Please email aadam02@emory.edu with comments and calendar submissions. Calendar submissions are due 5:00pm the Wednesday before the week of the event. Dates and details of events on calendar are subject to change; please confirm with organizers before you attend.

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