Brain injury patient who has recovered

Cover Story

Crash Course

When fifteen-year-old Thomas Sowell was transferred to Grady Memorial Hospital after experiencing severe brain trauma in a snowboarding accident, Emory neurologists prepared his parents for the worst. Then something remarkable happened. Story

Mind Mend? Progesterone is the next best hope for brain injury patients

Living with a Brain Injury More than three decades after a tragic car crash, alumna Sam Renfro struggles to keep her daughter safe and get her the help she needs

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Of Note

Features

Historic image of Porter Anderson

The Problem Solver

Since 1990, babies around the world have been benefiting from a vaccine developed by Porter Anderson 58C. You might expect to find him basking in the glow of that accomplishment. You would be wrong. Story

Artwork created to represent Miss Kitty's past

Patterns in Black and White

A formal apology for the role slaves played in building Emory’s campus and a landmark conference on slavery and universities are only recent chapters in a bigger story the University is trying to tell—through critical African American scholarship, accessible historic archives, civil rights cold cases warmed up, and a remarkable “family reunion.” Story

Bottle of Emtriva with pills

What’s the Big Idea?

From tiny pills that carry an atomic punch, to lasers that excise tumors, to software that predicts heart attacks, discoveries by Emory researchers are bringing new health and hope to millions every day. Story

Prelude

Behind Every Breakthrough

It’s easy to forget that scientific research is not actually conducted by wacky geniuses in stained white coats, but by women and men who are doing a job. Story

Letters

“I read with interest and anger the story about the Emory alum/Army colonel [Ted Westhusing, “An American Warrior”], and his service in the Iraq war. As a veteran of the Vietnam war, I was not surprised at the chicanery and folly he encountered in Iraq. That he felt his only course of action was to take his own life is profoundly sad. ”

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