Tribute: Randolph Thrower

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Randolph Thrower

Emory Communications

Randolph Thrower 34C 36L, an emeritus trustee who left a lasting legacy at Emory, died on March 8 at his home in Atlanta. Thrower had marked his one hundredth birthday in September.

While an Emory student, Thrower served as president of the student body and of his fraternity. He also met his wife, Margaret Logan Munroe, who died in 2009.

Thrower was elected an Emory trustee in 1972 and became an emeritus trustee in 1983. In 1969, he received the Emory Medal, the university’s highest alumni honor. He received an honorary doctor of laws from the university in 1984.

“Emory benefited greatly from Randolph’s ethical and far-sighted leadership as a longtime trustee,” says Emory trustee Laura Hardman 67C. “Both principled and pragmatic, he was consulted on all major issues for his good judgment.”

Since 1995, the School of Law and the Emory Law Journal have hosted the Randolph W. Thrower Symposium, part of an endowed lecture series sponsored by Thrower’s family.

“Mr. Thrower provides a shining example of a brilliant and creative professional who always remained integrally connected to his law school,” says Emory Law Dean Robert Schapiro.

Thrower joined the Atlanta law firm of Sutherland, Tuttle and Brennan in 1936, where he practiced tax litigation and remained a partner until his death. In 1969, he was appointed commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, where he served for two years before returning to his law practice. In 1993, the American Bar Association recognized Thrower’s achievements and contributions to the legal profession by presenting him with its highest award, the ABA Medal.

“Those who knew Randolph remember him for his unerring moral compass, his respect for all persons, regardless of station, and his gentle and dignified spirit,” says Thrower’s daughter Patricia Barmeyer. “But they also will never forget his wonderful wit and appreciation for a good story, told by him or anyone else.”

Thrower is survived by his five children, eleven grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.

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