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Emory Hosts Multi-Campus Forum on Racial Issues

Emory Invites Public To Reconciliation Symposium

Emory Marks 2000-2001 As Year of Reconciliation On Campus With Major Symposium


Year of Reconciliation Home Page


Year of Reconciliation Events Calendar


Reconciliation Symposium Schedule


Ambitious Year of Reconciliation Has Simple Origins

 

Open Letter on Year of Reconciliation from President Chace


Wayne Booth Discusses Rhetoric of Science Versus Religion

 

Indigo Girls Return for Emory Concert

 

Justice O'Connor Discusses Groundbreaking Path

 

Law School Explores Truth and Liability Issues

 

Shaw's "Back to Methuselah" Takes Emory Stage

 

Concert, Symposium to Explore Bach's Controversial St. John Passion

 

Oxford Hosts Varied Reconciliation Events

 

Op-Ed: Thoughts on Reconciliation by Emory Chancellor Bill Frye

 

Lipstadt, Lamm Give Thoughts on Holocaust to Overflow Crowd

 

Emory's Lipstadt, Attorney Rampton Highlight Nov. 1-2 Conference On Libel Law, Jewish Identity

Emory's Year of Reconciliation Opens With Talk By Renowned American Critic Wayne Booth

An Invitation to Emory’s Year of Reconciliation Symposium

October 2000

Dear Friends:

Emory University has declared 2000-2001 the "Year of Reconciliation" on campus as a central theme for its research, teaching and service. The university’s faculty, students, alumni and the public are engaging in a year-long series of lectures, symposia, performances and discussions on reconciliation as it relates to society’s most pressing issues—from global conflict to race relations, from health care to the environment.

The centerpiece of the year-long emphasis is a Symposium on Reconciliation Jan. 25-28, 2001. Included will be talks by Emory faculty member and former President Jimmy Carter; former Emory President and former U.S. Ambassador to Korea James Laney; and U.S. Rep. John Lewis. Also scheduled are a series of conversations and workshops on issues such as reconciling race and ethnicity, led by Presidential Distinguished Professor Johnnetta Cole; medical care and public health led by Presidential Distinguished Professor William Foege; social justice and reconciliation featuring former Southern Christian Leadership Conference President Joseph Lowery; and the tension between retributive and restorative justice featuring Justice Richard Goldstone of South Africa, former prosecutor in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and in the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

I invite you to join us for the symposium. Included on this page are links to more information about the Year of Reconciliation events and the Reconciliation Symposium schedule. We welcome you to share in the conversation.

Reconciliation is a natural theme for Emory, a university that has renowned programs in conflict resolution, health care, and law and religion—not to mention the presence of two of the world’s most famous reconcilers, President Carter and South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who recently completed a two-year stint on the faculty.

But the Year of Reconciliation at Emory will encompass more than conflict resolution or human rights; it includes the problems that arise from our inability to balance self-interest with social responsibility, or to weigh instant gratification against long-term good.

A university can create new knowledge that has the potential of "making the world a better place," but if it doesn’t link that knowledge with the hopes and aspirations of people, then it has fallen short of its potential as an agent for change. Emory’s aim is that the Year of Reconciliation will lead the university to a better understanding of what we know and believe; to more rewarding interactions with one another; to more imaginative and creative solutions and visions of new possibilities; and to more harmonious ways to engage our differences among and within us.

Sincerely,

Rebecca Chopp
Provost




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