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 Archived Great Teachers Lecture Series Releases

Oxford's Michael McQuaide Explores the New Acceptance of Alternative Health Care Techniques in Emory's Great Teachers Lecture

More and more Americans are embracing non-Western or "alternative" medical beliefs from acupuncture to holistic healing. Why is it that so many of us now accept notions that would have been scoffed at in the 1950s? Michael McQuaide, professor of sociology at Oxford College of Emory University, will discuss the topic in his lecture, "From Acupuncture to Shamanism, the Search for Well-being," the next offering in Emory's Great Teachers Lecture Series. The lecture is free and open to the public, and will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 23 in 207 White Hall on the Emory campus. For more information, call Evening at Emory at 404-727-6000. To see a campus map, go on-line to www.emory.edu/MAP/.

Students' Beliefs About Their Abilities Do Affect Their School Performance, Says Emory's Pajares in Jan. 27 Great Teachers Lecture

1-24-00

Atlanta, Ga. Do girls really not do as well in math as boys? How much of the hype and backlash about self-esteem can parents and educators really believe? What traps can well-meaning parents and educators fall into? Find out at Emory's Jan. 27 Great Teachers Lecture "Schooling in America: Myths, Mixed Messages and Good Intentions." The lecture by Frank Pajares, associate professor of educational studies at Emory University, will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27 in Cannon Chapel on the campus quadrangle. The event is free and open to the public. A map of campus is available on-line at www.emory.edu/MAP/. For more information, call 404-727-6216.

AIDS: Where Did It Come From? Where Is It Going? How Will It End?

11-10-99

Atlanta, Ga. Approximately 40 million people throughout the world are now infected with HIV, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), with 16,000 new infections occurring every day. Whereas 20 years ago it was an unknown disease, it is estimated that more than 2.5 million people died in 1998 as a result of HIV, making it the leading single cause of death due to an infectious disease, surpassing malaria and tuberculosis.

Ancient American Culture From Art

9-30-99

Atlanta, Ga. Art from the ancient Americas is characterized by colorful imagery, symbolism and shamanism, but it is modern, scientific detective work that is allowing researchers such as Emory's Rebecca Stone-Miller to learn more about ancient cultures from that artwork. Stone-Miller, associate professor of art history and faculty curator of art of the ancient Americas at the Michael C. Carlos Museum will deliver the next offering in Emory's Great Teachers Lecture Series with "'Seeing With New Eyes': Ways of Reconstructing Ancient American Culture From Art Alone" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 in Cannon Chapel on the Emory campus. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 404-727-7020.

 

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