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Release date:
April 10, 2001
Contact: Deb Hammacher, Assistant Director, 404-727-0644, or dhammac@emory.edu


Emory Orchestra/Chorus Concert Features Violinist Cerovsek

WHO: Emory University Orchestra and University Chorus, guest violinist Corey Cerovsek
WHEN: 8:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 25
WHERE: Glenn Memorial Auditorium, 1652 N. Decatur Rd., Emory.
PROGRAM:

Henryk Wieniawski's “Concerto No. 2 in D minor for Violin and Orchestra” (Corey Cerovsek, violin; Scott Stewart, conductor)
Vaughan Williams' “Dona Nobis Pacem”
(Emory Symphony Orchestra and University Chorus, Eric Nelson, conductor)

COST: Free and open to the public. 404-727-5050


One of the most sought-after young violinists on the classical music scene will be the featured violinist at the April 25 concert by the Emory University Orchestra and University Chorus, and better still, the event is free and open to the public. Corey Cerovsek will perform Henryk Wieniawski’s “Concerto No. 2 in D minor for Violin and Orchestra.” The other piece on the program is Vaughan Williams’ “Dona Nobis Pacem,” which will be performed by the orchestra and chorus together.

The selection of a concerto was a specific decision by instrumental music director Scott Stewart as a way to wrap up the orchestra’s involvement in the university’s Year of Reconciliation. “The concerto was a good choice because the concerto as a genre is a reconciliation in itself in that it is a balance of solo virtuosity and the collaborative nature of the large orchestra. I also thought it would be a nice balance against the Williams choral work,” says Stewart.

“Cerovsek is a young, rising star, and he brings a lot of energy and youthful vitality,” says Stewart. “I always want to expose my students to the best possible musicianship.”

The 29-year-old violinist is one of the true, rare prodigies, but not just in music. The Vancouver, British Columbia, native began studying the violin at age five, beat out 3,000 other musicians for the grand prize in the Canadian Music Competition at age nine, and graduated from the University of Toronto’s Royal Conservatory of Music with the highest marks in strings at age 12. That same year he was accepted at Indiana University—where he was a classmate of Stewart’s—to study with the famed teacher Josef Gingold. At age 15 Cerovsek earned his bachelor’s degree in music, but also in mathematics. Master’s degrees in both subjects followed at 16, doctoral degrees at 18.

And what do math and music have to do with each other? Apparently Cerovsek’s ability in both makes it easy for him to memorize an astounding repertoire of pieces. In a Tulsa, Okla., magazine interview in February, he said such memorization was “a matter of data compression” and that he has “lucky neurons.” The repertoire for each season of about 80 performances includes some 15 concerti and two or three recital programs.

Cerovsek is best known for his handling of material from the romantic violin tradition, although he does enjoy contemporary composers as well. He has recorded three CDs: a collection of Russian pieces titled “Russian Soul,” Mozart “Adagios” with pianist Carol Rosenberger, and a collection of Wieniawski’s music performed with his sister, pianist Katja Cerovsek.

The affinity for Wieniawski is no accident. Cerovsek studied under Gingold until the teacher’s death in 1995. Gingold had studied violin with Eugene Ysaÿe, who in turn had studied under Wieniawski (1835-80).

Cerovsek’s engagements this season include appearances with Austria’s Pannonische Philharmonie, New Zealand’s Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and Canada’s Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, in addition to several recitals. Other upcoming dates include performances with the Huntsville (Ala.) Symphony Orchestra, Long Beach (Calif.) Symphony Orchestra, Toledo (Ohio) Symphony Orchestra and the Berlin Symphony and Real Filharmonica orchestras.



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