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Release date:
April 4, 2001
Contact: Laurie Teague, 404-727-5339

Emory Dance Company Presents Spring Dance Concert April 19-21

 
WHO: Emory Dance Company
WHAT: "This is Our Playground," spring dance concert
WHEN: 8 p.m. April 19-21
WHERE: Mary Gray Munroe Theater, Dobbs University Center, 605 Asbury Circle, Emory.
COST: Reservations are recommended: $6 general admission; $4 professional artists, senior citizens, students with I. D.; and children 12 and under. 404-727-5050 or e-mail boxoffice@emory.edu. A map of campus is available on-line at http://www.emory.edu/MAP/.

Set a play date with the Emory Dance Company as they perform their spring dance concert, "This Is Our Playground," an evening of contemporary dance celebrating the spirit of imagination and experimentation. "This Is Our Playground," features seven new works by emerging choreographers from Emory's dance program. The concert will be at 8 p.m. April 19-21, 2001 in the Mary Gray Monroe Theatre, inside the Dobbs University Center, 605 Asbury Circle, on the Emory campus.

"Blue Monday," choreographed by Karyn Coates, is a personal journey defined by an intriguing combination of shape, gesture, pedestrian movement, classical ballet vocabulary and popular sound. A quintet of ballet dancers shifts identities as they struggle between beauty and practicality.

"Right Hand Red" is a full-bodied spin around Twister mats, full of intricacy and precision. The work, choreographed by Emory senior Blake Beckham, questions the limitations specific structures present in our lives and tempts the boundaries of those structures through rhythmic and dynamic invention in the body. The electronic musician of Aphex Twin enhances the whimsical quality of the work. Beckham proves there is life outside of the mats.

Luxuriating in shape and surging with vitality, choreographer Nina Stratt explores the dynamics of indulgent curves interspersed with quick, punchy motions to communicate our natural responses to external forces. The mesmerizing sound of Moby invigorates her ensemble of eight dancers and powerfully generates a landscape for the dance.

Lauren Gordon's new work translates the speed and complexity of our busy lives through spatial design. She weaves hip-hop and modern dance vocabulary with authentic gestures to create rich rhythmical phrases. The radiation of chaotic energy throughout the work builds in momentum, helping us identify with and process the resolution.

In her piece "Don't Break the Rules," choreographer Kelvey Stewart delivers a humorous, deadpan portrayal of gender behaviors. Inspired by her honors thesis research in dance, Stewart is influenced by the work of European choreographer Pina Bausch. She cleverly combines text from dating self-help books and popular dance music with pedestrian and contemporary movement to explore gender roles and gender difference in our society.

"Lullabye" implies simplicity, a return to our infancy when comfort was gained by simply being rocked to sleep in mother's arms. Exploring weight, repetition and the sway of the body, Rachel Glick's new work pays homage to those who rocked us to sleep, giving us the strength and support to face the night and beyond.

With fluid movement, full of peaks and falls, "Inner Dives" is a duet that investigates the evolution of relationships. In the creative process, choreographer Karen Hansen submerged herself in the powerful imagery of water to create a secure environment for the exploration of human relationships. This piece reveals our sense of discovery and honors our ability to take risks.

 


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